Hippity-Hoppity Horror: Avoiding a Veterinary Emergency Through Easter Pet Safety 

What’s in the Easter basket this year? Could it be something delicious? Could it also be a pet toxin? The Easter holiday, with its abundance of chocolate, candy, and delicious food, is also a big time of year for pet poison emergencies.

The focus on fun and family togetherness during Easter should be extended to your four-legged family through pet safety measures. It’s actually easy with some awareness and simple actions to keep these Easter foes from being eaten by your furry friend. 

A Tisket, a Tasket…Those Easter Baskets

A basket filled with toys and treats, what’s not to like? Your curious pet will also be intrigued and want to investigate, such as:

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Lonely or Just Alone? What to Know About Leaving Your Dog Home Alone

We all know that dogs are our best friends – after all, they are hard-wired to want to be with us all the time. And many of us would love to take them everywhere we go. Unfortunately, there are times when our dog pals can’t accompany us. Work, social functions, and other obligations sometimes dictate that we leave our dog home alone.

Leaving your dog home alone doesn’t a bad pet owner make. But there are some tips and tricks we can use to make this time spent alone more enriching for our dogs. Keep reading as Beverly Hills Veterinary Associates shares our best tips. 

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It Only Takes Minutes to Save a Life: Dogs In Hot Cars

A long-haired dog panting behind the window of a car with the windows rolled up

Leaving a dog alone in a car is never safe. But when temperatures and humidity climb, it can be downright deadly. In fact, being left in a car is the number one reason for heat-related death in dogs. 

Overheating and heat stroke can occur all too quickly. Beverly Hills Veterinary Associates explores the deadly mistake of leaving dogs in hot cars, and what you can do about it if you see one. 

Leaving Dogs in Hot Cars

The temperature in a car can rise more quickly than you might realize. The temperature inside your car can rise more than 20 degrees in just 10 minutes. In 20 minutes, it can rise 30 degrees. That means that if you leave your beloved dog in the car for 20 minutes on a 70 degree day, by the time you come back, the internal temperature of your car is 100 degrees. 

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