Potty Problems: Why Won’t My Dog Pee Outside?

A chocolate lab puppy looks abashed as it sits next to a puddle of piddle on a hardwood floor in a teal room

Do you have a poopy puppy? Or an older dog who has started peeing in the house? Perhaps you have a pooch who piddles on your guests’ feet. Whatever the case, potty problems can be upsetting for all. But, instead of unleashing your frustration, learn how to help your dog pee outside with the following tips. 

Bring in the Experts

There are instances when the answer to “Why won’t my dog pee outside?” is a medical problem. It is always a good idea and most fair to your dog to rule out disease, infection, and other physical issues before tackling the pee problem. We’re here to help! Call us to schedule an appointment. 

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Don’t Call the Tooth Fairy: What to Do When a Pet Loses a Tooth

For humans, losing our baby teeth is considered somewhat of a right of passage. For our four-legged friends, however, losing teeth can have a completely different meaning.

When a pet loses a tooth, usually something serious is going on. Your friends at Beverly Hills Veterinary Associates know how important your pet’s pearly whites are. We want you to know how to better care for your pet’s teeth so the doggy or kitty tooth fairy never needs to visit!

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Your Newly Adopted Pet: Now What?

A newly adopted pet needs veterinary care and lots of loveYou’ve found the perfect pet at your local shelter, rescue, reputable breeder – or maybe you’ve fallen in love with a friend’s kittens. It’s time to bring your new pet home, but now what? Maybe you’ve never had a pet before, or maybe you’ve always adopted older pets and now you have a new puppy or kitten – or vice versa.

Newly adopted pets are so exciting, fun, and rewarding. But, it’s also a big responsibility. Beverly Hills Veterinary Associates has some ideas for how to help your new pet become acclimated to your home, your family, and your life.

Before you bring your newly adopted pet home

Determine where your new pet will be spending most of his or her time. In the beginning, a smaller, safe, and secure space is important until your pet gets acclimated. Continue…